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Supreme Court rejects N.Y. concealed carry law

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Anti-scaling fencing is seen outside the Supreme Court, Thursday, June 23, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

OAN NEWSROOM
UPDATED 11:36 AM PT – Thursday, June 23 2022

The Supreme Court issued a ruling striking down New York’s concealed carry law. The decision, released Thursday, had six justices stating it violates the Second Amendment while three dissented. In the majority opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas wrote the state’s licensure laws are unconstitutional.

New York banned the issuance of concealed carry permits unless there is a demonstrable need for self defense, allowing the state to reject most permits. The court has now upheld the right of every American to self defense both on their own property and in public.

SCOTUS just struck down New York’s concealed carry law! This decision marks a historic, proper, & necessary victory for law abiding NYers, whose 2nd Amendment rights are under constant attack. I was proud to sign onto the Amicus Brief in support of @NYSRPA’s case.

— Lee Zeldin (@RepLeeZeldin) June 23, 2022

New York GOP Rep. Elise Stefanik praised the Supreme Court ruling striking down the state law. In a statement Thursday, she said the court correctly declared the state’s shameful attempt to shred the Second Amendment of New Yorkers to be unconstitutional.

Stefanik also called out the far-left for pushing unconstitutional gun measures as New York’s failed bail reform policies have made communities more unsafe. She contended the court’s ruling allows gun owners in the Empire State and across the nation to exercise their constitutional right to concealed carry.

🚨🚨The Supreme Court has ruled against New York State’s attack on #2A rights🚨🚨

My full statement⬇️ pic.twitter.com/0zDGJHTdlM

— Rep. Elise Stefanik (@RepStefanik) June 23, 2022

The courts decision came shortly after the Senate advanced an 80-page gun bill. On Tuesday, 14 Republicans, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), joined Democrats to push the bill to debate in a 64-to-34 vote.

The bill includes enhanced background checks for those under 21, funding for mental health and school safety, incentives for states to implement red flag laws and limits on the so-called boyfriend loophole. The Senate is looking to pass the gun reform package before summer recess, which begins July 4.

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